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Blizzard Bonafide

The Blizzard Bonafide absolutely, positively doesn’t care about the prevailing snow conditions. It can transition from brittle corduroy to 18 inches of fresh without a hitch in its stride. It’s this chameleonesque character that makes the Bonafide a perennial contender for the title of best all-condition ski, end of story. The Bonafide is able to bully beat-up snow because in many respects it’s built like an Old School GS race ski, which was the powder tool of choice in the era just prior to the proliferation of fat skis. Last year the Bonafide was given a wee bit more shape, making its carving performance even crisper without detracting one iota from its drift-ability in gnarly old snow. Extraordinary performance is the product of insightful design and the quality of its execution; the Bonafide attests to Blizzard’s scrupulous attention to both.

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Kästle MX99

What do orcas, Grizzly bears and the Kästle MX99 have in common? They’re at the top of the food chain in their respective environments and therefore completely in control and utterly at ease. The MX99 instinctively masters all terrain because it never met any member of the snow family that didn’t cower in its presence. It does not find hard snow to be hard and soft snow, even in its densest, most saturated form, is no match for its Titanal-fueled will power. Like all the Kästle MX models, the new MX99 has no attainable speed limit. You can fire the afterburners until your lips flap, but the MX99 will never lose its sangfroid.

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Stöckli Stormrider 95

The Stöckli Stormrider 95 is so instinctively powerful, once set in motion it radiates control, pulling the skier into its orbit. “Go faster,” it whispers. “Don’t worry about a thing. I’ve got this.” The Stormrider 95 is so masterful in all conditions, it feels as if it almost doesn’t need a pilot. You’re just there to point it downhill and let the Stormrider 95 attune itself to the rhythm of the slope. Last year the Stormrider 95 underwent a weight-loss program that included tapering the thickness of the two Titanal laminates that contribute to its eerie calm at speed. Because the latest Stormrider is lighter and more flexible, it feels quicker edge to edge than seems possible with a 95mm waist. The improved agility hasn’t affected the Stormrider 95’s principal virtue: it has the stability on edge of a tank, able to blast through a bunker of 3-day old crud
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Völkl M5 Mantra

Let the word go out across the land: the Mantra is back! The new M5 Mantra actually isn’t a replica of an older, cambered version revered by so many of the Volkl faithful; it has an identity all its own. The M5’s unique construction restores the cambered baseline and tighter waistline of earlier Mantras, but how its various components are assembled that set the fifth generation Mantra apart from its antecedents. Among all the things the new Mantra does better than the model it replaces – tighter turn entry, better edge grip on hard snow, a higher speed range – perhaps the most exciting is rebound, an end-of-turn kick in the pants that launches the skier out of the old turn and across the fall line. It’s a quality a lot of modern all-mountain skis are lacking and one the M5 Mantra glorifies.

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Nordica Enforcer 100

The Nordica Enforcer 100 has been an elite All-Mountain West ski since it materialized several seasons ago. It’s survived long enough to see a few offspring rise to parallel prominence in other genres: the Enforcer 93 is already a benchmark ski among the All-Mountain East clan, as is the women’s Santa Ana 93, and the Enforcer 110 is the crème de la crème of the Big Mountain brotherhood. As wonderful as it is to have successful children, it’s even better if the parent is still youthful enough to rock the fall line right alongside them. When it comes to demolishing a crud field, nothing beats the pater familias.

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Kästle FX95 HP

The most distinctive feature of the FX95 HP to the eye is the bright teal insert in its Hollowtech shovel. Its most distinctive feature on the snow is its Progressive Rise baseline that gradually elevates about a third of the running surface (404mm in the forebody, 242mm at the tail). Radically loosening the ski/snow connection allows the FX95 HP to be steered by any known technique, from a laid-over supercarve to a perpetual power drift. This may be Chris Davenport’s signature ski, but you sure don’t have to be in his league to imagine it was made just for you. The ever-perspicacious Bob Gleason calls the FX95 HP, “As smooth as crystal and strong as diamonds. Put it on edge with the hip inside and ride, baby, ride.”

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Fischer Pro MT 95 TI

The Pro MT 95 TI is a wide ski for people who don’t like wide skis. It behaves as if it were a lightweight carver with a middleweight’s punch: calm on edge, unperturbed by speed and undeterred by brittle hardpack. If the Pro MT 95 TI isn’t exactly agile, neither is it ponderous; it feels capable of any direction change the situation requires. Despite its design concessions to off-trail conditions, the Pro MT 95 TI doesn’t stray far from its carving roots. Carving isn’t just second nature to it – the way it rails from edge to edge reveals that carving is actually its first nature.

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Head Kore 99

Given its tapered tip and tail, the Kore 99 probably doesn’t care much about rocketing around on hardpack, but it has the good manners not to show it. Proof that it can handle the rigors of hard snow comes with the application of speed in increasingly heavy doses. (Note the nearly 9.0 average score for stability.) But the Kore 99’s proficiency on crispy corduroy is hardly the point; this ski was built for powder and its evil twin, crud. Not only is the Kore 99 palpably lighter than the norm, which reduces the power drain on the pilot, but its fairly straight midsection allows it to pivot more or less at will. This allows for the minor course corrections that are the difference between finding the freshies between the tracks and missing them. In a genre already well stocked with fall-line chargers, the Kore 99 provides an alternative snow feel.

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Dynastar Legend X 96

The attributes of All-Mountain West skis can be plotted along two axes: the Power/Finesse spectrum and the On-trail/Off-trail scale. The Dynastar Legend X 96 lives in the Finesse/Off-trail quadrant. The Legend X 96’s signature feature, Powerdrive, works differently from most shock-damping methods, by loosening the link between the outer sidewall and the central laminates. Powerdrive breaks the sidewall into three parts, which allows the main structural layers to sheer more easily, absorbing rough terrain the ski would otherwise bounce off. Because it manages to be damp without resorting to two sheets of Titanal, the Legend X 96 keeps the weight off and the stability up.

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Elan Ripstick 96

There must be something to this Amphibio deal, an asymmetric forebody that’s rockered above the outside edge and cambered over the inside edge. The Ripstick 96 flows over whatever run lies ahead, be it a rutted backside bump field or the pristine pinstripes of Deer Valley-quality groomage. It never loses its I-can-carve-that attitude, always striving to lay down twin tracks as if every run was down the frontside of Vail. A ski doesn’t attract above average scores unless it brings something extra to the party, which in the case of the Ripstick 96 is a little kick in the tail that scoots it through the turn transition. The boost into the next turn helps establish a rhythm that feels as natural as a waterfall.

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Atomic Bent Chetler 100

Even though its HRZN Tech tip and tail are built to drift first and think about carving, well, never, the BC 100 nevertheless doesn’t feel squirrelly or hard to manage. Au contraire, it seems up for anything that doesn’t entail being bored to death on groomers. “This was a nice surprise, a perfect balance between stability and playfulness,” says Kelli Gleason of Telluride’s Boot Doctors. Her Dad, the ever-ebullient Bob, also pegs playfulness as a cornerstone quality: “In the blending of playfulness mixed with precision, these are the top of the heap. Easy to ski in variable conditions,” he adds.

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K2 Pinnacle 95 Ti

Three seasons ago K2 radically revised its ski design, ditching more than a decade’s worth of dampening material and generally paring away excess weight wherever it could. By its own estimation, it went a little too far, so last year K2 reduced the rocker and bolstered the construction of its new star, the Pinnacle 95, with more mass, metal and camber. None of these improvements altered its flagship’s easy-going nature, so the renamed (but not re- redesigned) Pinnacle 95 Ti remains mindlessly simple to ski. One reason the Pinnacle 95 Ti earns elevated scores for Forgiveness is it doesn’t need a high edge angle to hold, so Finesse skiers can tootle along with their feet comfortably underneath them and still ride a secure edge.

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Line Supernatural 100

The Finesse side of the Supernatural 100’s split personality dominates when it’s skied at low speeds, while its Power traits don’t reveal themselves unless the pilot applies the lash. The Supernatural 100’s ability to adapt to the moods of its master makes it particularly suited to the Finesse skier. Its preference for off-piste terrain is signaled by its gradual “5-Cut™” shape that’s made to drift and carve in roughly equal measures. The glass in its structure provides energy and the Titanal delivers dampening, improved edge grip and better control when churning through heavy snow that would deflect a lesser ski.

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Dynastar Legend W 96

Dynastar draws no distinction between its men’s Legend X and women’s Legend W models, except that the men’s are predominantly black and the women’s white. The same construction that works well for guys is gangbusters for gals. Petite skiers are teed up for success by a 13m sidecut radius – a short radius to match a shorter skier – tucked inside a relative behemoth in terms of surface area. These contrasting traits give the Legend W 96 surprising agility for its girth and gobs of flotation for off-trail environs. The lighter weight is less fatiguing and makes Legend W 96 ideal for the advanced skier transitioning to a wide ski for the first time.

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Blizzard Black Pearl 98

The tale of the Black Pearl 98 is instructive on several levels. On the construction front, this Pearl has been through several phases, including periods when it was a direct copy of a men’s model. It still uses the same tool as the unisex Bonafide – perhaps the greatest all-terrain ski ever – but Blizzard switched to a Women’s Specific Design (WSD) a couple of seasons ago. What’s notable is that the model that most closely matched the Bonafide was a flop, but the WSD Pearl 98 is so well-balanced women want to take it everywhere. The current Black Pearl 98’s became a couple of steps quicker last year when it adopted a tighter sidecut with an earlier contact point. Along with the weight savings from WSD, its new, deeper sidecut makes the Black Pearl 98 feel narrower and consequently quicker edge-to-edge.

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Atomic Vantage 97 C W

As you’d expect from a ski built to be as minimalist as possible, in the hand the Vantage 97 C W feels light enough to fly away, but it’s so stable on snow one tester even found it “stiff-ish.” It’s certainly a lot more ski than is normally available at a street price of $499. Kelli Gleason of Boot Doctors in Telluride, pegs the 2019 Vantage 97 C W as “more powerful than its predecessor, this ski is a charger and can be sized down to accommodate a more timid skier.” An extraordinary value for the accomplished skier, it’s also the perfect escort for the off-trail debutante who needs a forgiving partner to show her the ropes.

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K2 Fulluvit 95Ti

There are three top-line reasons why women should entrust their precious time in powder to K2 and its flagship women’s ski, the FulLUVit 95 Ti. (BTW, the Ti is new to its name but not to its composition.) First, K2’s wheelhouse is building wide skis for the off-piste adventurer. Second, K2 was one of the first brands to develop a complete line of women’s skis and involve recreational female skiers in their product development and testing process through the K2 Women’s Alliance, which celebrates its 20th anniversary this season. The third and most important reason for hopping on a FulLUVit 95 Ti is that no other ski makes off-trail skiing any easier without surrendering stability on groomers. If the primary quality you want in your next all-terrain ski is ease of operation, you’ve found your ski.

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Nordica Santa Ana 100

Last year Nordica changed the construction of the Santa Ana 100, and while it didn’t fiddle with its shape or baseline, the components of its laminated lay-up were altered in every respect. Its 2017 balsa core was beefed up with poplar and beech and sandwiched between two .4mm Titanal laminates. The Santa Ana metamorphosed from the original, mellowed-out surfer girl into hard-edged gal that won’t take any crap from crud. The great advantage of metal in what’s intended primarily as an off-trail ski is how it behaves in the heavy, harbor-chop crud that can deflect models without Titanal.

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